This is an example page. It’s different from a blog post because it will stay in one place and will show up in your site navigation (in most themes). Most people start with an About page that introduces them to potential site visitors. It might say something like this:

Hi there! I’m a bike messenger by day, aspiring actor by night, and this is my blog. I live in Los Angeles, have a great dog named Jack, and I like piña coladas. (And gettin’ caught in the rain.)

…or something like this:

The XYZ Doohickey Company was founded in 1971, and has been providing quality doohickeys to the public ever since. Located in Gotham City, XYZ employs over 2,000 people and does all kinds of awesome things for the Gotham community.

As a new WordPress user, you should go to your dashboard to delete this page and create new pages for your content. Have fun!

4,938 thoughts on “Sample Page

  1. Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of countries, which are broadly seen as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” markets. It is also recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  2. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, a second military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  3. Nigeria attained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been mainly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  4. Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mostly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  5. Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule starting in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  6. Since 2002, sectarian violence has been found by the North East of the nation by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring states, at the exact same time, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to battle Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram attacks to these nations.

  7. Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it reached a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted relatively pretty and freely, in 1999.

  8. An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons decided to remain in Nigeria Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the nation was now much bigger in relation to the southern part. In 1963, the state established a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power when elections were held in 1965.

  9. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in the southern part of the state, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for instance those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  10. Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of states, which are broadly viewed as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” markets. It is also recorded among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the biggest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  11. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other nations in the West African region, as its exceptional way of contact tracing became an effective process later used by other nations, including the United States, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  12. {Nigeria has one of the largest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a transnational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  13. Nigeria attained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was largely dominated by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  14. Since 2002, the North East of the nation has found sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and create Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 claimed that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At the exact same time, neighbouring nations, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram strikes to these nations.

  15. Nigeria gained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition comprised the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mainly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  16. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for the natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations like Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  17. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self-governing states, the independent nation confronted the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  18. Nigeria is considered to be an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has also been identified as an emerging global power, and continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  19. Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  20. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern area of the nation. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  21. An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons decided to remain in Nigeria Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern part of the state was now far bigger as opposed to southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the nation, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  22. Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  23. {Nigeria has among the largest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  24. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, predominantly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mostly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  25. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations like Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  26. Nigeria plunged into a civil war, and became a formally independent federation in 1960. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it reached a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted pretty freely and fairly, in 1999.

  27. Nigeria is often referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world.

  28. Nigeria attained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was largely controlled by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  29. An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons chose to stay in Nigeria Southern Cameroon picked to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the country was now far larger compared to the southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the country, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  30. Nigeria, one-third bigger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern coast; inland are hardwood woods.

  31. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  32. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest economy in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  33. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern area of the country. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  34. Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous state in the world.

  35. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  36. Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly viewed as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” economies. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  37. Since 2002, sectarian violence has been found by the North East of the country by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay process of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring states, at the exact same time, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to battle Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these states.

  38. Nigeria became a federation that was independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war. It’s since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it reached a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted pretty fairly and freely, in 1999.

  39. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, purchasing power parity and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  40. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the enormous revenue and OPEC created made the market more loaded. Despite enormous revenues from oil production and sale, the military government did little help small and medium businesses, to enhance the standard of living of the population, or put money into infrastructure. As oil sales fuelled the rise of national subventions the government became the centre of political struggle and the brink of power in the state. As oil production and sales rose, the Nigerian government became increasingly dependent on oil revenues and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  41. Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a federation that was independent in 1960. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it attained a stable democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be conducted moderately fairly and freely.

  42. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, predominantly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, a second military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  43. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, chiefly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mostly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  44. {Nigeria has among the biggest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a transnational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  45. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, predominantly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra on May 30, 1967. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  46. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self-governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  47. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, purchasing power parity and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  48. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  49. Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mostly controlled by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  50. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, a second military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mostly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  51. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for the natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations like Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and rare primate habitats. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  52. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively check and remove the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other nations in the West African area, as its unique way of contact tracing became an effective technique afterwards used by other states, including the United States Of America, when Ebola risks were discovered.

  53. An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations for example Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  54. Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly viewed as the world’s next “BRIC-like” markets. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  55. The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons decided to remain in Nigeria Southern Cameroon picked to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the state was now much bigger than the southern part. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the country, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria when elections were held in 1965.

  56. Nigeria is regarded as an emergent marketplace by the World Bank;It continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs, and contains already been identified as an emerging global power.

  57. Nigeria attained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition included the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was mainly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  58. An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations like Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and rare primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  59. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the tremendous earnings created made the market more loaded. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did little help small and medium businesses, to improve the standard of living of the population, or purchase infrastructure. The government became the centre of political battle and the threshold of power in the nation as petroleum revenues fuelled the rise of national subventions to states. The Nigerian government became increasingly dependent on petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for economic and budgetary concerns, as oil production and revenue climbed. It did not develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  60. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, primarily of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  61. Since 2002, sectarian violence has been seen by the North East of the nation by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 claimed that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring states, at exactly the same time, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to battle Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram strikes and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  62. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self-governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  63. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern area of the nation. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  64. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively contain and eliminate the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other states in the West African region, as its exceptional approach to contact tracing became an effective process afterwards used by other states, including the United States, when Ebola risks were discovered.

  65. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  66. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth $1 trillion and more than $500 billion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest market in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  67. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, chiefly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, another military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra on May 30, 1967. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  68. Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous state on earth.

  69. Nigeria is an associate of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly seen as the globe’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It’s also listed among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the largest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the United Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and Nations amongst other international organisations.

  70. Nigeria is frequently referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous nation in the world.

  71. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, chiefly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra on May 30, 1967. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  72. Nigeria, one third larger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  73. {Nigeria has one of the greatest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 different languages, and are identified with broad assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  74. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest market in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  75. Since 2002, the North East of the nation has found sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At the same time, neighbouring states, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  76. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  77. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  78. Since 2002, the North East of the state has found sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the same time, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the wake of a world media highlighted the spread of Boko Haram strikes and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these states.

  79. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  80. Nigeria gained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mostly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  81. An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern part of the country was now far bigger compared to the southern part. As its first president, the state created a Federal Republic in 1963. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  82. Nigeria became a independent federation in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it attained a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted relatively fairly and freely.

  83. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other nations in the West African region, as its exceptional approach to contact tracing became an effective system later used by other countries, such as the United States Of America, when Ebola dangers were discovered.

  84. Nigeria, one-third bigger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern coast; inland are hardwood woods.

  85. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent nation confronted the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  86. Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a federation that was independent in 1960. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it attained a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be conducted reasonably freely and fairly, in 1999.

  87. {Nigeria has among the biggest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups talk over 500 different languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  88. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively check and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as its exceptional approach to contact tracing became an effective system afterwards used by other countries, including the Usa, when Ebola risks were discovered.

  89. An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. Southern Cameroon elected to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria. The northern part of the state was now much larger than the southern part. As its first president, the nation created a Federal Republic in 1963. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  90. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent nation confronted the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  91. Nigeria is thought of as an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs, and has also been identified as an emerging global power.

  92. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  93. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known because of its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations like Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  94. An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the state was now far larger in relation to the southern area. In 1963, the country established a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  95. Nigeria is considered to be an emergent marketplace by the World Bank;It has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs, and has also been identified as an emerging global power.

  96. Nigeria became a independent federation in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it attained a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted relatively pretty and freely, in 1999.

  97. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other states in the West African area, as its exceptional approach to contact tracing became an effective system later used by other countries, including the United States, when Ebola risks were found.

  98. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in Muslims in the northern area, and the southern part of the nation. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for instance those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  99. Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  100. Nigeria is often called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world.

  101. Nigeria is regarded as an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has already been identified as an emerging global power, and continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  102. {Nigeria has among the greatest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a transnational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with wide variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  103. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known because of its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations including Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  104. Nigeria is frequently referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world.

  105. Nigeria gained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition comprised the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been mostly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  106. Since 2002, sectarian violence has been found by the North East of the country by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring states, at once, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to combat Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram strikes to these countries.

  107. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  108. Nigeria is considered to be an emerging market by the World Bank;It continues to be identified as a regional power a middle power in international affairs, on the African continent, and has already been identified as an emerging global power.

  109. Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  110. An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for the natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations such as Cross River National Park and Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and rare primate habitats. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  111. An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for the natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations including Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  112. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a free federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  113. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, normally called Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea in the Atlantic Ocean. It comprises 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where Abuja, the capital is situated. Nigeria is formally a secular state that is democratic.

  114. {Nigeria has one of the largest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with broad assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  115. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively check and remove the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as its unique way of contact tracing became an effective strategy later used by other states, including the United States Of America, when Ebola risks were found.

  116. Nigeria, one-third bigger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern shore; inland are hardwood woods.

  117. Nigeria gained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was largely controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  118. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for the natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations including Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  119. The North East of the country has found sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and establish Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring states, at the exact same time, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these states.

  120. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively check and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other nations in the West African region, as its unique method of contact tracing became an effective strategy afterwards used by other countries, such as the Usa, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  121. Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  122. The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon selected to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons chose to stay in Nigeria. The northern area of the state was now much larger as opposed to southern area. The country created a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe as its first president. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria when elections were held in 1965.

  123. {Nigeria has among the greatest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a multinational state, as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with broad variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  124. Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  125. Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), which was largely controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  126. Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of countries, which are broadly viewed as the globe’s next “BRIC-like” markets. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the biggest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  127. Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a federation that was independent in 1960. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it attained a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran moderately freely and fairly, in 1999.

  128. Nigeria is regarded as an emergent market by the World Bank;It has also been identified as an emerging global power, and continues to be identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs.

  129. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent state confronted the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  130. An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known because of its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations such as Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and infrequent primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  131. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively contain and eliminate the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as its exceptional method of contact tracing became an effective process after used by other countries, including the United States Of America, when Ebola hazards were found.

  132. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern part of the nation, and Muslims in the northern area. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  133. An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations such as Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and rare primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national currency.

  134. An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons decided to remain in Nigeria Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the state was now much bigger as opposed to southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the state, with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  135. Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world.

  136. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the southern area of the nation, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  137. Nigeria, one third larger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the nation into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood woods.

  138. The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring countries, at once, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the wake of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these states.

  139. The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons chose to stay in Nigeria Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the country was now far bigger compared to the southern area. In 1963, the country created a Federal Republic, with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  140. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in the southern part of the state, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  141. Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the nation into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  142. The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon elected to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons chose to stay in Nigeria. The northern part of the nation was now much larger in relation to the southern part. In 1963, a Federal Republic was established by the nation, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  143. An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. While Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria Southern Cameroon elected to join the Republic of Cameroon,. The northern part of the country was now much larger than the southern part. In 1963, a Federal Republic was established by the nation, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria.

  144. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, normally known as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea. It contains 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja is located. Nigeria is formally a democratic laic country.

  145. Nigeria is often called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world.

  146. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a free federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  147. Nigeria is a part of the MINT group of countries, which are broadly seen as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” economies. It’s also recorded among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest on the planet. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the United Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and Nations amongst other international organisations.

  148. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively contain and eliminate the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other states in the West African area, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective approach after used by other countries, like the United States Of America, when Ebola hazards were found.

  149. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern area of the state, and Muslims in the northern area. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for instance those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  150. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the huge revenue created made the economy more affluent. Despite huge revenues from oil production and sale, the military government did little purchase infrastructure, help small and medium businesses, or to improve the standard of living of the population. The government became the centre of political battle and the threshold of power in the country, as petroleum sales fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states. The Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by oil revenues and the international commodity markets for economic and budgetary concerns as oil production and revenue rose. It did not develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  151. Modern-day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  152. Nigeria is often referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous state on earth.

  153. The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay system of government and create Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring states, at the same time, Cameroon, Chad, Benin and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to battle Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these nations.

  154. Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the country into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern coast; inland are hardwood woods.

  155. Nigeria attained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) headed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition consisted of the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been mostly dominated by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  156. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively contain and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other nations in the West African area, as its exceptional method of contact tracing became an effective technique afterwards used by other states, like the United States, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  157. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the tremendous revenue and OPEC generated made the market more affluent. Despite huge revenues from oil production and sale, the military administration did little to improve the standard of living of the population, help small and medium businesses, or spend money on infrastructure. The federal government became the centre of political battle and the threshold of power in the country as oil revenues fuelled the rise of national subventions to states. The Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by oil sales and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns, as oil production and sales rose. It didn’t develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  158. Nigeria is often called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous nation on the planet.

  159. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self-governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  160. Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  161. An imbalance was created in the polity by the result of the 1961 plebiscite. Southern Cameroon chosen to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons decided to stay in Nigeria. The northern part of the nation was now far larger compared to the southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was established by the state, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria, when elections were held in 1965.

  162. Nigeria is thought of as an emerging marketplace by the World Bank;It has already been identified as an emerging global power, and has been identified as a regional power a central power in international affairs, on the African continent.

  163. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the enormous sales created made the economy richer. Despite huge earnings from sale and oil production, the military government did little to improve the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or spend money on infrastructure. As petroleum earnings fuelled the rise of national subventions the government became the threshold of power and the centre of political struggle in the country. As oil production and sales rose, the Nigerian government became increasingly determined by petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns. It failed to develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  164. The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon elected to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria. The northern part of the country was now far bigger than the southern part. In 1963, a Federal Republic was established by the nation, with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in Nigeria’s Western Region when elections were held in 1965.

  165. Nigeria is often known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world.

  166. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a free federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  167. Nigeria is frequently known as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous state in Africa and the seventh most populous country on earth.

  168. Modernday Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule starting in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  169. Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  170. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in Muslims in the northern part, and the southern part of the state. A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  171. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern area of the nation, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those native to Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  172. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, typically referred to as Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It contains 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where Abuja, the capital is situated. Nigeria is officially a democratic secular nation.

  173. Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and economy. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most populous country on earth.

  174. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mostly of Ibo ethnicity, seized control. In July, another military coup put Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an alternative unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mostly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  175. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, predominantly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from your north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  176. Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous nation in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower path of the Niger River flows south through the western area of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood forests.

  177. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, chiefly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, an option unacceptable to the Ibos. Also in that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the predominantly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  178. Nigeria is a part of the MINT group of nations, which are widely seen as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” markets. Additionally it is listed among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the largest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the African Union, Nations, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  179. An imbalance was created in the polity by the consequence of the 1961 plebiscite. Southern Cameroon preferred to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons chose to continue in Nigeria. The northern part of the state was now far larger compared to the southern area. In 1963, the nation created a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria when elections were held in 1965.

  180. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the tremendous earnings and OPEC generated made the economy more loaded. Despite huge revenues from oil production and sale, the military government did little help small and medium businesses, to enhance the standard of living of the population, or purchase infrastructure. The government became the centre of political struggle and the threshold of power in the state as petroleum sales fuelled the rise of national subventions to states. As oil production and sales climbed, the Nigerian government became increasingly determined by oil sales and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economical concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  181. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, purchasing power parity respectively and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest market in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  182. Nigeria is regarded as an emergent market by the World Bank;It has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a middle power in international affairs, and contains also been identified as an emerging global power.

  183. Nigeria, one-third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Mangrove forests and swamps border the southern shore; inland are hardwood woods.

  184. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the enormous revenue and OPEC generated made the market more affluent. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military government did little to enhance the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or put money into infrastructure. The federal government became the center of political battle and the brink of power in the nation, as oil earnings fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states. The Nigerian government became increasingly determined by oil sales and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns, as oil production and revenue rose. It did not develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  185. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It consists of 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where Abuja, the capital is located. Nigeria is formally a democratic secular country.

  186. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest economy in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  187. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the huge revenue generated made the market more loaded. Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military government did little to enhance the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or put money into infrastructure. As petroleum revenues fuelled the rise of national subventions to states, the government became the brink of power and the centre of political battle in the nation. The Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by petroleum sales and the international commodity markets for economic and budgetary concerns as oil production and sales rose. It didn’t develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  188. Nigeria is thought of as an emerging market by the World Bank;It continues to be identified as a regional power a middle power in international affairs, on the African continent, and has already been identified as an emerging global power.

  189. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  190. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent nation confronted the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  191. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively control and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique way of contact tracing became an effective technique later used by other nations, including the United States, when Ebola threats were found.

  192. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined the enormous sales and OPEC generated made the market more affluent. Despite enormous revenues from sale and oil production, the military administration did little purchase infrastructure, help small and medium businesses, or to improve the standard of living of the population. As oil earnings fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states, the government became the center of political battle and the threshold of power in the state. The Nigerian government became increasingly dependent on petroleum sales and the international commodity markets for economical and budgetary concerns as oil production and sales grew. It did not develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  193. Nigeria is thought of as an emerging market by the World Bank;It has been identified as a regional power on the African continent, a central power in international affairs, and contains also been identified as an emerging global power.

  194. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the southern area of the state, and Muslims in the northern part. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  195. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, primarily of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup set Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mostly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven from the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern area, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  196. Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mostly controlled by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  197. Since 2002, the North East of the nation has found sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay process of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 promised that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the same time, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in an united effort to fight Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media emphasized kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram attacks to these countries.

  198. Nigeria is often referred to as the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market. With approximately 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous state in the world.

  199. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly called Nigeria, is a national constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. Where Abuja, the capital is located, it contains 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory. Nigeria is officially a democratic secular nation.

  200. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly called Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea. It comprises the Federal Capital Territory and 36 states, where the capital, Abuja is situated. Nigeria is formally a secular state that is democratic.

  201. {Nigeria has among the greatest populations of youth in the world. The nation is viewed as a transnational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.

  202. The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the lay process of government and create Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 claimed that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring countries, at the exact same time, Cameroon, Chad, Benin and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to fight Boko Haram in the wake of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these states.

  203. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for the natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations including Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and rare primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  204. The North East of the nation has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 maintained that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. At exactly the same time, neighbouring states, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in an united effort to fight Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram strikes to these states.

  205. Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group (AG), that was mainly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo. The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  206. {Nigeria has one of the greatest populations of youth in the world. The country is viewed as a transnational state, as it’s inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 distinct languages, and are identified with extensive assortment of cultures. The official language is English.

  207. Nigeria plunged into a civil war, and became a independent federation in 1960. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it attained a secure democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be ran reasonably pretty and freely, in 1999.

  208. Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule starting in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms.

  209. The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and establish Sharia law, by Boko Haram. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 claimed that Boko Haram assaults have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring countries, at the same time, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to battle Boko Haram in the consequences of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram attacks and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to these countries.

  210. Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It has since switched between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it attained a stable democracy with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be ran moderately pretty and freely, in 1999.

  211. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  212. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  213. Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of nations, which are broadly viewed as the earth’s next “BRIC-like” markets. Additionally it is recorded among the “Next Eleven” economies set to become among the biggest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of the United Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and Nations amongst other international organisations.

  214. Rioting broke out in 1966, and military leaders, mainly of Ibo ethnicity, assumed control. In July, a second military coup place Col. Yakubu Gowon in power, a choice unacceptable to the Ibos. Also for the reason that year, the Muslim Hausas in the north massacred the mainly Christian Ibos in the east, many of whom had been driven in the north. Thousands of Ibos took refuge in the eastern region, which declared its independence on May 30, 1967 as the Republic of Biafra. Civil war broke out. In Jan. 1970, after 31 months of civil war, Biafra surrendered to the federal government.

  215. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest market, worth $1 trillion and more than $500 billion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  216. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other nations in the West African region, as its unique method of contact tracing became an effective strategy afterwards used by other states, including the United States Of America, when Ebola threats were discovered.

  217. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, purchasing power parity and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest economy in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  218. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other states in the West African region, as its exceptional way of contact tracing became an effective method later used by other countries, including the Usa, when Ebola dangers were discovered.

  219. The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon picked to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons decided to stay in Nigeria. The northern area of the state was now far bigger as opposed to southern area. In 1963, a Federal Republic was created by the country, as its first president with Azikiwe. When elections were held in 1965, the Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in Nigeria’s Western Region.

  220. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, worth $1 trillion and more than $500 billion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s largest market in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is only 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  221. The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. While Northern Cameroons decided to stay in Nigeria Southern Cameroon selected to join the Republic of Cameroon. The northern area of the state was now much larger than the southern area. The nation established a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power in the Western Region of Nigeria when elections were held in 1965.

  222. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other states in the West African region, as its unique way of contact tracing became an effective method later used by other countries, including the United States Of America, when Ebola threats were discovered.

  223. An African country on the Gulf of Guinea, Nigeria, is known for its natural landmarks and wildlife reserves. Safari destinations for example Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense savanna, rainforest and rare primate habitats and Cross River National Park. Among its most identifiable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- tall monolith outside the capital of Abuja that’s pictured on the national money.

  224. Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of states, which are broadly seen as the globe’s next “BRIC-like” economies. Additionally it is listed among the “Next Eleven” markets set to become among the biggest on earth. Nigeria is a founding member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the African Union, OPEC, and the United Nations amongst other international organisations.

  225. Nigeria, an African country on the Gulf of Guinea, is known for wildlife reserves and its natural landmarks. Safari destinations such as Yankari National Park showcase waterfalls, dense rainforest, savanna and rare primate habitats and Cross River National Park. One of its most recognizable sites is Zuma Rock, a 725m- .

  226. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria attained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Arranged as a loose federation of self-governing states, the independent nation faced the overwhelming task of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  227. Nigeria became a federation that was formally independent in 1960, and plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, until it achieved a secure democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be conducted pretty fairly and freely.

  228. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the enormous earnings generated made the market richer. Despite huge earnings from sale and oil production, the military administration did little invest in infrastructure, help small and medium businesses, or to improve the standard of living of the population. As oil revenues fuelled the rise of national subventions the federal government became the brink of power and the center of political struggle in the state. As oil production and sales grew, the Nigerian government became increasingly determined by petroleum revenues and the international commodity markets for economic and budgetary concerns. It didn’t develop other sources of the economy for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  229. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest economy, purchasing power parity respectively and worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP. It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest economy in 2014.Also, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  230. Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a formally independent federation in 1960. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian authorities and military dictatorships, until it reached a stable democracy in 1999, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed to be conducted relatively freely and fairly.

  231. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively control and remove the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other nations in the West African region, as its exceptional approach to contact tracing became an effective method later used by other states, such as the United States, when Ebola dangers were found.

  232. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC and the enormous sales generated made the market more affluent. Despite enormous earnings from sale and oil production, the military government did little purchase infrastructure, help small and medium businesses, or to improve the standard of living of the population. As oil sales fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states, the federal government became the center of political struggle and the threshold of power in the nation. As oil production and revenue climbed, the Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by petroleum sales and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economic concerns. It did not develop other sources of the market for economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism.

  233. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first country to effectively control and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other countries in the West African area, as its unique method of contact tracing became an effective technique afterwards used by other nations, including the Usa, when Ebola dangers were found.

  234. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively contain and remove the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as its unique approach to contact tracing became an effective system later used by other countries, including the United States Of America, when Ebola hazards were found.

  235. The North East of the country has seen sectarian violence by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular system of government and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that Boko Haram attacks have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people crippled. Neighbouring states, at exactly the same time, Chad, Benin, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in an united effort to battle Boko Haram in the aftermath of a world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram assaults to these states.

  236. Nigeria, one third larger than Texas and the most populous country in Africa, is situated in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. Its neighbors are Benin, Niger, Cameroon, and Chad. The lower course of the Niger River flows south through the western part of the state into the Gulf of Guinea. Swamps and mangrove forests border the southern shore; inland are hardwood woods.

  237. Modern day Nigeria has been the site of numerous kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional chiefdoms.

  238. The consequence of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance. Southern Cameroon opted to join the Republic of Cameroon while Northern Cameroons decided to continue in Nigeria. The northern area of the country was now far larger than the southern part. As its first president, the country established a Federal Republic in 1963. The Nigerian National Democratic Party came to power when elections were held in 1965.

  239. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its shore in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea in the Atlantic Ocean. Where Abuja, the capital is situated, it contains 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory. Nigeria is formally a laic state that is democratic.

  240. On Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria gained independence, becoming a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and joining the United Nations. Organized as a free federation of self-governing states, the independent state faced the overwhelming job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.